Commenly Asked Questions About Adult Scoliosis


The backbone of the natural person has natural curves, and these curves are responsible for turning our shoulders, as they make the lower back slightly bent forward. But some people have other curves on the sides of their spine. And unlike what happens because the body is taking unhealthy positions, these side bends cannot be fixed simply by learning to stand up straight. The state of the lateral curvature of the spine is called scoliosis or “spine warp”. In an x-ray, the spine of a person with “curvature of the spine” appears closer to the letter “S” or the letter “C” rather than as a straight line. Also, some bones of the spine with “spinal warp” may have rotated slightly, making the patient’s waist or shoulders appear uneven.

Spinal warp “is a descriptive term and not a diagnosis. In more than 80% of cases, no specific cause can be found and such cases are called self-referring illnesses, which are unknown cause. This is common among adolescent girls. Scoliosis is not defined with scoliosis. Children if it occurs in children from zero to three years of age and scoliosis other than adults if it occurs in children from the age of four to ten years and adolescents scoliosis in patients from the age of eleven to eighteen years and adult scoliosis in patients from the age of eighteen and above. It can cause deformation of the spine, such as congenital ills of the spine (present at birth – called congenital scoliosis), neurological disorders (nerve and muscle scoliosis), hereditary conditions, and other conditions. Scoliosis does not occur as a result of carrying heavy things, exercising, or sleeping / standing positions other than Intact or slight difference in the length of the lower extremities.

Do I suffer from scoliosis?
The best way to determine whether or not you have scoliosis is for a doctor to have a clinical examination of your back. The examination is done while you are in a relaxed position with your hands next to you. The doctor will look at you from the back looking for curvature of the back, asymmetry of the shoulder blades, asymmetry of the waist line, or any displacement in the trunk. Then, you will bend forward from the center of your waist and the doctor will watch your back again for signs of rotating “spine curvature” in the upper part of the back (protrusion of the ribs) or in the lower part of the back (protrusion of the flank or middle). After this simple examination, the doctor will usually order primary x-rays of the spine – a posterior view and another side view of the entire spine from the neck to the pelvis. If there is a “spinal warp”, the doctor will measure the measurements in the radiation and determine the degree of “spine warp” with the numbers to help describe the condition.

What are my treatment options?

  1. Follow-up:
    The follow-up system is applied in the curves that are found in a teenager of growing age and the measurements show that their degree is small (“curvature of the spine” in adolescence) or curves of medium degree (40 – 45 degrees) that are found in a person who has completed growth. For adults, the follow-up and physiotherapy regimen is applied in patients with mild symptoms if their curves are not significant.
  2. Medical belt:
    This is used in curves between 25 and 45 degrees in developing children to prevent increased curvature while maintaining the continued growth of the spine. The goal of the belt is to prevent another new increase in curvatures as the belt cannot repair existing curvatures.
  3. Surgical treatment:
    This treatment is generally applied to curves of more than 50 degrees in adolescents and adults. Surgery can also be performed for smaller curvatures if the appearance of curvature annoys the patient or if there are symptoms associated with “spine curvature” in an adult patient. This is generally done by installing metal screws in the vertebrae and then fixing them in metal columns for the purpose of correcting the curvature of the spine and keeping it in the correct position until there 

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